[Let's Discuss & Share!] Sharing Suttas

Discussion in 'Thai Amulets & More Discussion' started by Ben50845, 26 March 2015.

  1. nampada
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    A series of talk by Chao Khun Petch (with chinese translation) in NDR. Shifu is low profile practitioner of the dhammayut tradition.











    Shifu's temple Wat Sanam Brahm is located in Petchaburi Province.

    In the recently years with many invitation of his overseas devotees,he have been travelling to malaysia and Singapore to give dhamma talks in various centers and temples.

    Some picture of a close Msian Devotee who visited this temple

    http://luckystar3366.blogspot.sg/2010/09/blog-post_24.html
     
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  2. AA BATTERY
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    CK Keng Dhamma talk in Hokkien (in Medan, Indonesia)

     
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  3. Randelavie
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    useful sharing. especially protection one.

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  4. AA BATTERY
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  5. AA BATTERY
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    Sharing an interesting article I found.

    ========================

    Buddhaghosa and Buddha Recollection: Notes and Resources – GnoTruth


    There is more information in a book called The Legend and Cult of Upagupta: Sanskrit Buddhism in North India. Information about Phussadeva can be found in the Sihalavatthuppakarana, an important and often-neglected Pali collection of tales dating from perhaps the fourth century.

    The Elder Phussadeva was a Sri Lankan monk who resided at the Kalankandra Monastery. One day, when he had finished sweeping the courtyard of the Bodhi tree and was contemplating the tree, recollecting the qualities of the Buddha, Mara arrived and created a sudden gust of wind. The dust raised made the elder close his eyes, and, in that moment of blindness, Mara threw some trash into the Bodhi-tree enclosure and went away. The elder had to sweep it again.

    ‘Then once more’ the text goes on, ‘the elder recollected the qualities of the Buddha, but Mara came again, as a monkey; he grabbed this and that branch of the Bodhi tree and made a mess. Again the elder swept and recollected the qualities of the Buddha. Then, Mara became an old ox, and, walking back and forth, he trampled the courtyard of the Bodhi tree.’

    At this point, Phussadeva wonders who is causing all of these disturbances, and, realizing it is Mara, he denounces him. Mara, knowing he has been found out, shows himself in his true form. Then, Phussadeva declares:

    “You are able to fashion magically and manifest the form of the Buddha. I wish to see that form, Evil One, and I ask you to show it.”

    “Very well,” Mara consented, and he made clearly manifest the figure of the Great Sage, in the seated posture of a Buddha under a Bodhi tree and bearing the thirty-two excellent bodily marks. The elder Phussadeva, seeing the form of the Buddha, proffered an anjali, and, with tears in his eyes, with great faith, pondering the conduct of the bodhisattva from the time of the wholly enlightened Dipankara, he recollected the qualities of the Buddha”
     
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  6. nampada
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    A clip on the celebration of Ajarn Keng Khemako receiving the conferment of Chao Khun in Wat Palelai A long clip with dharma talks by Ajarn Geoff and Shifu himself.

     
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  7. AA BATTERY
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    Great blessings indeed for lay people in Singapore & Johor to have wise teachers like Chao Khun Keng to propagate the true Dhamma. Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu.
     
  8. Ben50845
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  9. Ben50845
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    ..[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  10. AA BATTERY
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    Caṇḍāla Suttaṃ
    (A.iii.206)

    The Outcaste

    “Monks, endowed with five qualities a lay disciple becomes an outcaste of a lay disciple, a stain of a lay disciple, and one to be scorned. What five? He or she is without faith, he or she is immoral, one who relies on rituals, not on actions (kamma), one who looks for outsiders to donate to, and one who gives there first.

    “Monks, endowed with five qualities a lay disciple becomes a gem of a lay disciple, a red and white lotus of a lay disciple, a white lotus of a lay disciple. What five? He or she has faith, he or she is moral, one who relies on actions (kamma) not on rituals, one who does not look for outsiders to donate to, and one who gives here first.”


    =======================

    Comments

    Assaddho: A well-informed and virtuous lay disciple of the Buddha has firm confidence in his teachings based on listening to or studying them carefully, applying them in practice, and gaining personal realisation of the universal truths contained therein. He or she is not credulous and is not easily beguiled by charlatans who perform magic tricks, or even those who have genuine mystic powers, but who lack insight. For example, Devadatta had acquired some psychic powers, and through the exhibition of these powers Prince Ajātasattu was greatly impressed. Misled by Devadatta, he killed his own father King Bimbisāra to gain control of the kingdom. Some naïve and uneducated Buddhists are beguiled and misled by simple magician’s illusions used by charlatans who do not have any genuine psychic powers such as those possessed by Devadatta.

    Dussīlo: He or she is immoral, not observing the five basic precepts incumbent upon all genuine disciples of the Buddha — Abstaining completely from: 1) Killing living beings, 2) Taking what is not given, whether by force, by stealth, or by deception, 3) Engaging in illicit sexual relations, 4) Telling lies, slandering others, abusing others, or indulging in idle chatter such as jokes and stories with no benefit for this life or the next, 5) Intoxicating drugs and drinks that lead to heedlessness. A genuine Buddhist is a teetotaler.

    Kotūhalamaṅgaliko: Festivals and auspicious signs. Superstitious Buddhists place too much faith in amulets, sacred threads (pirit nul), astrology, ceremonies, and rituals. Not understanding the teachings in the Maṅgala Sutta, which the Buddha taught to debunk superstitious beliefs, they rely on listening to recitations of the Maṅgala Sutta, and tying sacred threads around their wrists (which is a Hindu tradition, not a Buddhist one), instead of practising the Maṅgala Dhamma so clearly explained by the Blessed One in that very discourse. The true blessings and protection from dangers derive from not associating with the foolish, but associating with the wise, paying homage to those worthy of homage, and the other thirty-five excellent virtuous practices enumerated in the Maṅgala Sutta. A Stream-winner, being a genuine Buddhist, is completely free from reliance on rites and rituals (sīlabbataparāmāsa).

    Bahiddhā dakkhiṇeyyaṃ gavesati: The Buddha was not resentful of offerings given to others. He encouraged the wholesome deed of giving alms, saying that one should give wherever the heart is pleased. Even if one gives to an animal, the benefit is returned a thousandfold. What he is saying here is that one without faith, who is immoral, and superstitious will be inclined to look elsewhere to donate. A charlatan or a Buddhist monk of dubious moral character will flatter donors and devotees, wishing to receive more and more offerings. A virtuous monk or nun who desires the long-term welfare and spiritual benefit of his or her supporters will urge them to practice morality and meditation rather than emphasising donation, which is easier, but of less benefit. If a lay disciple lacks morality, he or she will be ashamed to visit virtuous monks and nuns, fearing that he or she might be admonished for not practising the true Dhamma, or may be embarrassed to admit his or her inability to undertake and observe the five precepts scrupulously. It is not easy to be a devout and genuine follower of the Buddha. The truth of suffering must be understood, the truth of craving must be abandoned, the truth of the cessation of craving must be realised, and the truth of the Noble Eightfold Path must be developed.

    Tattha ca pubbakāraṃ karoti: Due to the reasons outlined above, the faithless disciple will be included to donate outside of the Buddha’s dispensation first, because a weak person will obviously prefer to be flattered rather than admonished.

    A disciple who has faith, who is virtuous, who relies on kamma and not on rituals, will not be fearful of visiting virtuous monks and nuns. On the contrary, his or her heart will leap up, and a keen interest will be aroused to listen to discourses and admonishments about the benefits of practising meditation, or developing insight, and relinquishing attachment to worldly things.


    Caṇḍala Suttaṃ
     
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  11. Ben50845
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    ....[​IMG][​IMG][​IMG][​IMG]

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  13. AA BATTERY
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    The book "Only we can help ourselves" by Venerable Dhammavuddho Thero. I read it too. Highly recommended reading. Sadhu Sadhu Sadhu.
     
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  14. Ben50845
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    Another good book. Just showing a sample
    [​IMG][​IMG]

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  15. Ben50845
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    Yes u r right abt the source[​IMG]

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  16. AA BATTERY
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    Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (1)

    translated from the Pali by
    Thanissaro Bhikkhu
    © 2005


    I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the Sakyans near Kapilavatthu in Nigrodha's Park. Then Mahanama the Sakyan went to the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down to him, sat to one side. As he was sitting there, he said to the Blessed One, "Lord, this Kapilavatthu is rich & prosperous, populous & crowded, its alleys congested. Sometimes, when I enter Kapilavatthu in the evening after visiting with the Blessed One or with the monks who inspire the mind, I meet up with a runaway elephant, a runaway horse, a runaway chariot, a runaway cart, or a runaway person. At times like that my mindfulness with regard to the Blessed One gets muddled, my mindfulness with regard to the Dhamma... the Sangha gets muddled. The thought occurs to me, 'If I were to die at this moment, what would be my destination? What would be my future course?"

    "Have no fear, Mahanama! Have no fear! Your death will not be a bad one, your demise will not be bad. If one's mind has long been nurtured with conviction, nurtured with virtue, nurtured with learning, nurtured with relinquishment, nurtured with discernment, then when the body — endowed with form, composed of the four primary elements, born from mother & father, nourished with rice & porridge, subject to inconstancy, rubbing, pressing, dissolution, & dispersion — is eaten by crows, vultures, hawks, dogs, hyenas, or all sorts of creatures, nevertheless the mind — long nurtured with conviction, nurtured with virtue, learning, relinquishment, & discernment — rises upward and separates out.

    "Suppose a man were to throw a jar of ghee or a jar of oil into a deep lake of water, where it would break. There the shards & jar-fragments would go down, while the ghee or oil would rise upward and separate out. In the same way, if one's mind has long been nurtured with conviction, nurtured with virtue, nurtured with learning, nurtured with relinquishment, nurtured with discernment, then when the body... is eaten by crows, vultures, hawks, dogs, hyenas, or all sorts of creatures, nevertheless the mind... rises upward and separates out.

    "Have no fear, Mahanama! Have no fear! Your death will not be a bad one, your demise will not be bad."

    Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (1)
     
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  17. AA BATTERY
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    Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (2)

    translated from the Pali by
    Thanissaro Bhikkhu
    © 1997


    I have heard that on one occasion the Blessed One was staying among the [1] the Blessed One will set out wandering." Mahanama the Sakyan heard that many monks were at work making robes for the Blessed One, [thinking], "When the robes are finished, at the end of the three months, the Blessed One will set out wandering." So he approached the Blessed One and, on arrival, having bowed down, sat to one side. As he was sitting there he said to the Blessed One: "I have heard that many monks are at work making robes for the Blessed One, [thinking], 'When the robes are finished, at the end of the three months, the Blessed One will set out wandering.' For those of us living by means of various dwelling places [for the mind], by means of which dwelling place should we live?"

    "Excellent, Mahanama, excellent! It is fitting for clansmen like you to approach the Tathagata and ask, 'For those of us living by means of various dwelling places [for the mind], by means of which dwelling place should we live?'

    "One who is aroused to practice is one of conviction, not without conviction. One aroused to practice is one with persistence aroused, not lazy. One aroused to practice is one of established mindfulness, not muddled mindfulness. One aroused to practice is centered in concentration, not uncentered. One aroused to practice is discerning, not undiscerning.

    "Established in these five qualities, you should further develop six qualities:

    [1] "There is the case where you recollect the Tathagata: 'Indeed, the Blessed One is worthy and rightly self-awakened, consummate in knowledge & conduct, well-gone, an expert with regard to the world, unexcelled as a trainer for those people fit to be tamed, the Teacher of divine & human beings, awakened, blessed.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the Tathagata, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the Tathagata. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the Buddha while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.

    [2] "Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect the Dhamma: 'The Dhamma is well-expounded by the Blessed One, to be seen here & now, timeless, inviting verification, pertinent, to be realized by the wise for themselves.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the Dhamma, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the Dhamma. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the Dhamma while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.

    Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (2)
     
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  18. AA BATTERY
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    [3]
    "Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect the Sangha: 'The Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples who have practiced well... who have practiced straight-forwardly... who have practiced methodically... who have practiced masterfully — in other words, the four types [of noble disciples] when taken as pairs, the eight when taken as individual types — they are the Sangha of the Blessed One's disciples: worthy of gifts, worthy of hospitality, worthy of offerings, worthy of respect, the incomparable field of merit for the world.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the Sangha, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the Sangha. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the Sangha while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.

    [4] "Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect your own virtues: '[They are] untorn, unbroken, unspotted, unsplattered, liberating, praised by the wise, untarnished, conducive to concentration.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting virtue, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on virtue. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of virtue while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.

    [5] "Furthermore, there is the case where you recollect your own generosity: 'It is a gain, a great gain for me, that — among people overcome with the stain of possessiveness — I live at home, my awareness cleansed of the stain of possessiveness, freely generous, openhanded, delighting in being magnanimous, responsive to requests, delighting in the distribution of alms.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting generosity, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on generosity. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of generosity while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children.

    [6] "Furthermore, you should recollect the devas: 'There are the Devas of the Four Great Kings, the Devas of the Thirty-three, the Devas of the Hours, the Contented Devas, the devas who delight in creation, the devas who have power over the creations of others, the devas of Brahma's retinue, the devas beyond them. Whatever conviction they were endowed with that — when falling away from this life — they re-arose there, the same sort of conviction is present in me as well. Whatever virtue they were endowed with that — when falling away from this life — they re-arose there, the same sort of virtue is present in me as well. Whatever learning they were endowed with that — when falling away from this life — they re-arose there, the same sort of learning is present in me as well. Whatever generosity they were endowed with that — when falling away from this life — they re-arose there, the same sort of generosity is present in me as well. Whatever discernment they were endowed with that — when falling away from this life — they re-arose there, the same sort of discernment is present in me as well.' At any time when a disciple of the noble ones is recollecting the conviction, virtue, learning, generosity, and discernment found both in himself and the devas, his mind is not overcome with passion, not overcome with aversion, not overcome with delusion. His mind heads straight, based on the [qualities of the] devas. And when the mind is headed straight, the disciple of the noble ones gains a sense of the goal, gains a sense of the Dhamma, gains joy connected with the Dhamma. In one who is joyful, rapture arises. In one who is rapturous, the body grows calm. One whose body is calmed experiences ease. In one at ease, the mind becomes concentrated.

    "Mahanama, you should develop this recollection of the devas while you are walking, while you are standing, while you are sitting, while you are lying down, while you are busy at work, while you are resting in your home crowded with children."

    Mahanama Sutta: To Mahanama (2)
     
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  19. Ben50845
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  20. AA BATTERY
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    Another interesting book to share,

    Download link: http://www.forestdhamma.org/ebooks/english/pdf/Mae_Chee_Kaew.pdf

    English « Books « forestdhamma.org

    ===============================================================


    Ghosts of the Mountain

    Book title: "Mae Chee Kaew - Her journey to Spiritual Awakening and Enlightenment"


    Under Ajaan Khamphan’s leadership, the monastery at Phu Gao Mountain developed into a vibrant spiritual environment where monks and nuns focused diligently on their meditation practice. Ajaan Khamphan had lived under Ajaan Sao’s tutelage for several years, and he directed monastic affairs in the same spirit that his famous mentor had. At Phu Gao Mountain, a harmonious sense of fraternity prevailed, everyone living together in unity. The sight of the monks peacefully walking to the village for alms each morning was impressive. The nuns would remain at the monastery, gathered in the open-air kitchen to cook rice and prepare simple dishes to augment the food from the monks’ daily alms gathering. The villagers had constructed a long bench at the monastery’s entrance. Here the nuns stood and placed the food they had prepared into the monks’ bowls on their return from the village. Back in the monastery, at the main sala, the monks ate together in silence, seated according to seniority. Having received a blessing, the nuns retired to their quarters to have their meal — also in silence and according to seniority. When the monks finished eating, each monk washed his bowl, dried it thoroughly, replaced its cloth covering, and put it neatly away. The women washed the dishes and the cooking utensils, put everything neatly away and swept the kitchen area clean.

    Once the morning duties were complete, all the monastics returned to the secluded environment of their small huts, where they concentrated on meditation, either walking or sitting. The monks and nuns remained in the forest until four p.m. when the afternoon chores began. Upon returning from the forest, they first swept the monastery grounds.When sweeping was finished, they worked together to carry water from the nearby pools to fill the various water vessels: water for drinking, water for washing feet, and water for washing alms bowls and cooking pots. After a quick bath, they resumed their meditation. On nights when no meeting was scheduled, they continued to practice late into the night before retiring.

    Normally, Ajaan Khamphan called a general meeting of the monks and nuns once a week, on lunar observance days. Convening at dusk, the whole assembly chanted in unison, intoning sacred verses in praise of the Buddha, Dhamma and Sangha. After the soft resonance of their voices receded, Ajaan Khamphan delivered an inspiring discourse on meditation practice. When he finished speaking, he addressed any questions or doubts expressed by his disciples, and advised them about how they could move their meditation forward. If pressing questions arose on other days, they could seek his personal advice at any convenient time. Ajaan Khamphan maintained an exemplary mode of practice that inspired reverence in his disciples. He was gentle and gracious, possessing an unassuming manner that was always simple and down-to earth. His spiritual practice and virtuous conduct reflected a truly calm and peaceful frame of mind. He was highly skilled at attaining states of deep meditative calm, and very knowledgeable about the diversity of phenomena that could be experienced in samādhi. Because of this, his meditative skills were compatible with Mae Chee Kaew’s own innate abilities. His mind converged into states of deep samādhi with consummate ease, resulting in extensive contact with beings of the spirit realm. Mae Chee Kaew was able to take advantage of his expertise to further her own skills in the many unusual aspects of samādhi, and was grateful for Ajaan Khamphan’s guidance.
     
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